Update: Jayson has removed the post with the images. I appreciate his coming forward and admitting the mistake was truly a mistake and removing the blog post. I’m leaving this post up for posterity but removing his last name and company name.

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It’s nice when people use my photos. Sometimes they ask permission and sometimes they just link to my blog or Flickr page. Sadly, this isn’t always the case and while I reach out to everyone that uses my photos without permission asking kindly that they simply put photo-credit, this doesn’t always get done and I’m left with someone hosting my image without proper attribution. I used to have my photos as Creative Commons licenses where anyone could use them for non-commercial purposes as long as they credit me and don’t alter the image but now, they’re “all rights reserved”.

Jayson has a blog and used my property without permission and the property of a few people I know. I asked him to offer credit and he hasn’t complied in 48 hours. He’s pretty active on Twitter so unless he’s really bad at email, he’s seen my message.

  • Blog Post: http://jaysonelliot.com/blog/2013/09/19/the-top-twenty-beers-in-the-world
  • Jayson’s Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/JaysonElliot

The photos of mine he’s using is that of Cantillon Fou Foune, an apricot Lambic. You can see it on his blog and here’s a link to the original image I took. He’s also using my photo of Lawson’s Double Sunshine IPA.

I did some digging and that every photo on the blog post I linked above is not owned by Jayson, nor is it attributing the author. Here’s a list of blogs where the original photos were uploaded that are being hot linked on Jayson’s blog:

Is it surprising that all of the photos in use are owned by someone else? No and I fully embrace the ‘remix’ culture of the web but if you’re going to use photos in a blog. You have to ask permission. I’ve been through this from both sides and that’s why I took up photography. If you don’t want to shoot your own photos, everyone has a Twitter handle. Ping them with the URL and image link and ask if you can hot-link it. If that’s too much work, go back to sharing stories in 140 character blips.

Jayson, sorry man. I’ll update the blog post once you either attribute the images or remove them. Thanks.